FAQ2019-10-06T14:39:14+00:00

Answers To General Questions About Scouting

If I need to turn in Health Forms, who do I see?2019-11-10T15:42:21+00:00

Our Health Forms Coordinator.

If I have questions regarding my BSA training or wish to get additional training, who do I see?2019-11-09T22:34:30+00:00

Our Training Coordinator.

How do I become a youth leader in the Troop?2019-11-10T15:36:42+00:00

The Troop holds elections each December.  You can run for a position or see the Senior Patrol Leader or Scoutmaster for any potential open positions in the interim.  An outline of each leadership position can be found in our Troop Handbook.

What is “Base Camp?”2019-11-09T22:33:44+00:00

Troop 810 is dedicated to making the first year in Scouts a great experience for our newest recruits. Our Base Camp Program is specifically designed to help our newest Scouts learn basic outdoor skills, meet advancement requirements through First Class, and have a fun and successful transition into our full scouting program. Base Camp meets during most Troop meetings and also on camping trips. Our Base Camp Assistant Scoutmasters and Troop Guides and Instructors run his or her program year-round. Upon reaching the rank of First Class (usually one year to 18 months), Scouts ‘graduate’ out of Base Camp as solid Scouts that can handle virtually any challenge.

Who can I talk to about starting the Eagle process?2019-11-09T22:33:23+00:00

If you want to become an Eagle Scout and you’re a Life Scout or close to being a Life Scout it is highly recommended that you attend a Life to Eagle Seminar, however it is not required.  The District normally holds these in April and October. Listen to announcements, watch e-mails and check the Harford District Website for upcoming dates. You should also speak with the Scoutmaster and then choose an Eagle Scout Coach to help guide you through the process.

Where do I purchase Class A uniform items?2019-11-09T22:32:47+00:00

The closet Scout Shop in the Festival in Bel Air next to Kohls.  It is located at 5 South Bel Air Parkway, Abingdon, MD 21009. (410) 569-2714. 

How do I purchase Class B uniform items?2019-11-09T22:32:27+00:00

Normally the Troop takes orders in the spring and delivers the items prior to summer camp.  You may check with our Scoutmaster at anytime to see if items are available.

What are Merit Badges and how do I earn them?2019-11-09T22:31:42+00:00

Merit badges concentrate on a particular field of expertise or a specific skill and can be earned by Scouts in cooperation with a merit badge counselor. Each merit badge has an accompanying booklet that can be borrowed from the Troop library, or purchased at the Scout Shop. There are over 130 merit badges available, and some are required before a Scout can earn the Star, Life, or Eagle rank. The required merit badges can be earned in any order. Consult the Scout Handbook for information on which merit badges are optional and which are required. Merit badge opportunities are offered at the Troop, District and Council levels and at summer camp. Announcement of these opportunities will be given at Troop meetings or by Troop mailings. Additionally, Scouts are encouraged to pursue any merit badges that interest them by seeking out an approved merit badge counselor at any time. 

 

The following policies govern Troop merit badge work:

  • The Scout should approach a Scoutmaster or the Membership Coordinator on the Committee and ask for the names and phone numbers of merit badge counselors in the area. A list of Troop merit badge counselors is also available on the Troop web site.
  • When the Scout first asks for the name of a merit badge counselor, he or she will need to request a “blue card” to track their progress through the merit badge requirements from the Scoutmaster. This card will be filled out by the Scout, signed by the Scoutmaster, and then taken to every meeting with the merit badge counselor. The counselor will not meet with a Scout without a blue card.
  • The Scout is then responsible for contacting the counselor, asking for help working on the badge, and setting up the first meeting time.
  • Merit badge work is to be done outside of the Troop meetings unless scheduled as part of the Troop meeting.
  • When the merit badge is complete, the merit badge counselor will sign the card. These records are very important. The Scout should immediately turn in the blue card to the Scoutmaster.  
  • Meetings with a merit badge counselor must be with another adult. Scouts should never meet with a merit badge counselor without someone else being present.
  • Maximum time limits to complete a merit badge are directly controlled by the merit badge counselor.  Minimum time will be controlled by the merit badge requirements. Every merit badge will have limits to insure the Scout is learning and displaying the skill necessary to complete the merit badge.
  • Scouts must present a properly completed blue Merit Badge application card to the Scoutmaster before award of the Merit Badge can be made.
  • The Merit Badge will be awarded at the next Court of Honor.  Merit badges are worn on the merit badge sash.
  • The Scout should be very careful to save all the completed blue cards and store them in a safe place. Plastic notebook pages used by baseball card collectors are a great way to store the blue cards for safekeeping.

The Troop appreciates the involvement of parents in the merit badge process. If you have expertise or knowledge of a particular merit badge topic and would like to serve as a merit badge counselor, please contact the Membership Coordinator.

If I need a blue card who do I see?2019-11-10T15:38:25+00:00

A Scout (not parent) should see the Scoutmaster for a blue card.

If I need to verify my merit badges or advancement record, who do I see?2019-11-09T22:30:47+00:00

The Advancement Chair.

Does the Troop have merit badge resource books that I can borrow?2019-11-09T22:30:23+00:00

Yes, you would need to see our Troop Librarian. 

What is “advancement?”2019-11-09T22:29:39+00:00

Scouting provides a series of surmountable obstacles and steps in overcoming them through the advancement method. The Scout plans his advancement and progresses at his own pace as he meets each challenge. The Scout is rewarded for each achievement, which helps him or her gain self-confidence. The steps in the advancement system help a Scout grow in self-reliance and in the ability to help others. 

 

Through participation at Troop meetings, outdoor activities, and working on his or her own, the Scout will have an opportunity to work on badges and skills that will help them advance through the Scouting ranks. The first of these ranks is the Scout, which the Scout will earn by joining the Troop, learning some simple Scouting concepts, and having his or her first Scoutmaster Conference. After the Scout Badge, the Scout will continue through Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, and Life. Finally, he may be able to earn the highest honor in Boy or Girl Scouting, the rank of Eagle.

 

The Scout, Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class ranks require work mainly on the basic outdoor and first aid skills every Scout needs to know.  The Star and Life ranks require work on merit badges, leadership, and service to the community. The Eagle rank continues to work on merit badges, leadership, and service to the community. The leadership requirement can be fulfilled by actively and satisfactorily fulfilling a formal Troop junior leadership position. The requirement can also be fulfilled by demonstrating leadership on a special project as agreed to with the Scoutmaster. An approved Eagle project that provides a lasting improvement for the community must also be completed. The Scout must complete all Eagle requirements before his or her eighteenth birthday.

 

All ranks also have a requirement that specifies that a Scout must show Scout Spirit in his or her daily life. How the Scout behaves at meetings and during outings is usually the greatest measure of their Scout Spirit and will affect the decision of the Scoutmaster to sign off on their requirements and permit advancement. Scout Spirit also includes behavior outside of Scouting. Any pertinent information that the Troop receives concerning a Scout’s behavior outside of Scouting may be considered by the Troop leadership in assessing Scout Spirit.

 

As the requirements for rank are completed, the Scout must present him or herself with his or her Scout Handbook to a Scoutmaster, Assistant Scoutmaster or Guide. The Scoutmaster or Guide will make sure each requirement has been met and will initial and date the item in the Scout’s Scout Handbook. The Scout should be ready to prove they really have completed the requirement before they ask someone to sign their book. Requirements can only be approved in the Scout Handbook, so the Scout should make sure they have the book with them at all times.

 

Being active in your troop is a requirement for advancement; Troop 810 has set these criteria at the 50% threshold of all Troop activities (meetings, camping, and service projects) while individual cases can be discussed with the Scoutmaster in advance. However, be advised greater Troop participation is required to earn the rank of Eagle.  Troop 810 also encourages all Scouts to participate in all meetings, events and outdoor activities regardless of rank but is also aware that many Scouts have multiple commitments. 

 

After the requirements for a rank are completed, the Scout must schedule a Scoutmaster Conference and Board of Review. Once the Scoutmaster Conference and Board of Review are successfully completed, the Scout earns his or her rank. 

 

Advancement is the responsibility of the Scout! Parents are encouraged to help, but the ultimate responsibility must lie with the Scout. A parent who takes those responsibilities robs the Scout of his or her opportunity to share in the Scouting experience.  Parents should not contact a Scoutmaster or Advancement Coordinator with questions regarding rank advancement; such requests should come from the Scout. 

 

Scouts who do not advance over a long period of time may be asked to meet with a Scoutmaster to see what can be done to help the Scout continue to advance.

 

The Scouts will be asked to interact and communicate with adults that they may not know very well throughout their Scouting experience, but particularly when working on merit badges. Learning to do this is an important part of the Scout experience and a great life skill. Communication can be face-to-face, by phone, or by e-mail.

What is a Scoutmaster’s Conference and when does a Scout need one?2019-11-09T22:28:48+00:00

The Scoutmaster Conference is a time for the Scout and the Scoutmaster or Assistant Scoutmaster to sit down and talk about how the Scout is progressing towards his or her next rank. The Scoutmaster will ask questions regarding how well the Scout has learned the items required for the rank they are completing. The Scout should come to the Scoutmaster conference with their Scout Handbook, wearing their full Class “A” uniform and be ready to talk openly and honestly about their Scouting experiences. The Scoutmaster will be assessing the individual needs of the Scout, helping him or her to set goals for their next rank, and trying to gauge the success of the Troop program.

  •   Scoutmaster Conference‘s will be scheduled only when requested by the Scout. A Scout can request a Scoutmaster Conference at any time by notifying the Scoutmaster in advance. The Scout cannot just ask for a Scoutmaster Conference the night of a meeting.
  •   Before a Scout can have a Scoutmaster Conference for the purpose of advancement, all the requirements must be signed and dated in his or her Scout handbook. Unlike Cub Scouts, a parent is not authorized to sign off on their son’s or daughter’s book. The handbook should also document (event and date) activities in fulfillment of community service hours and camping nights.  There is a section to record his or her information in the back of the Scout Handbook.  If the requirements for advancement were completed at Scout camp, then the Scout is responsible to have the requirements transcribed from any documents given at camp into the Scout Handbook.  The Scout may also present a TroopMaster activity report to the Scoutmaster to meet his or her requirement.
  •   If the Scoutmaster does not sign off on the Scoutmaster Conference, the Scout may be asked to review some of the requirements and schedule another Scoutmaster Conference when the Scout feels he is ready. The Scout needs to know that if he needs any help he must ask. There are many people, Scouts and adults who are available to help the Scout succeed.
  •   After completing the Scoutmaster Conference, the Scout must schedule a Board of Review, by contacting the Advancement Coordinator.

  Eagle Scoutmaster Conferences are far more involved frequently taking hours and must be scheduled with the Scoutmaster directly.

If I need a Scoutmaster Conference who do I contact?2019-11-09T22:28:05+00:00

Any Scoutmaster or Assistant Scoutmaster

What is a Board of Review and when does a Scout need one?2019-11-09T22:27:37+00:00

After completion of the Scoutmaster Conference, the Scout will appear before a Board of Review. A Board of Review will be comprised of 3 adults (non-Scoutmasters). There is a pool of Committee members and parents available to sit on a Board of Review. Members serving on Boards of Review will receive training on how to conduct a Board of Review.  Boards of Review shall be held for all Scouts who have completed a Scoutmaster Conference. The Scoutmaster is not in attendance. During the Board of Review, the Scout presents him or herself to the Board. They must be in full Class A uniform, including merit badge sash. Shorts and tennis shoes are not permitted. Their appearance should be neat, their attitude good, and their manner respectful. They will be asked to repeat the Scout Oath, the Scout Law, the Outdoor Code, the Scout Motto, and the Scout Slogan.  They will then be invited to sit down, and the Board will ask him or her questions about their Scouting and personal life. The questions can range very widely, so the Scout should be ready to communicate openly and honestly. The object of the Board of Review is to ensure that documentation is present verifying that all requirements for advancement have been met; to examine the attitude of the Scouts in the Troop, and to ensure that the program offered by the Scoutmaster is fun, exciting, and meets the goals of Scouting.

 

  • The Scoutmaster Conference and Board of Review can be stressful, particularly for younger Scouts. It is important to remember that this experience is part of the Scout’s development as a young man or women and helps him or her to learn to communicate and handle situations.
  • A Scout may advance at any time once the requirements for the rank have been achieved and the Scoutmaster and Board of Review have approved the advancement. The advancement will take effect immediately after final approval of the Board of Review. However, formal recognition of the advancement will take place at the regularly scheduled Courts of Honor.
  • A Scout being considered for the Eagle rank, in addition to the Troop Scoutmaster conference, must undergo a special Eagle Board of Review, consisting of officials from our Troop and the District. The Scoutmaster, Eagle Coach and Eagle Advisor will work with the Eagle candidate to prepare him them for the District Board of Review.
If I need a Board of Review, who do I see?2019-11-09T22:26:53+00:00

The Advancement Chair.

What are the fees for camping and Troop activities?2019-11-09T22:26:07+00:00

The Troop keeps the cost of dues low, and collects fees for most camping events or activities that have additional expenses associated with the specific event, such as food costs and transportation. Fees will vary depending on the duration of the campout or activity (2 nights versus 1 night), the distance traveled, whether or not registration fees or park permits are required and any special equipment for the activity. Failure to register and/or pay on time as indicated by the Trip Leader could result in exclusion from the event.

If I have questions regarding my Scout Account balance, who do I see?2019-11-09T22:25:07+00:00

Our Treasurer.

What are the Troop Dues?2019-11-09T22:24:12+00:00

Dues are paid quarterly, as determined by the Troop Committee. Currently dues are $20 per quarter or $80 per year plus the annual recharter fee set by BSA. Payment of dues entitles Scouts to hold positions of leadership within the Troop, attend meetings, camping functions and any other Scout function. If dues are not paid timely, the Scout is considered “inactive.” If dues are not paid in full as of November 1, as we re-charter our Troop, a Scout’s membership maybe dropped from the BSA and Troop rolls. The money generated from dues is used for insurance, advancement material, annual re-chartering, equipment and training classes for adult leaders and Scouts. A copy of our annual budget with details regarding our fees and expenses is available to all parents and our Treasurer provides regular updates on the Troop’s finances at our Committee meetings.

What is the Outdoor Code?2019-10-16T00:20:41+00:00

As an American, I will do my best to
Be clean in my outdoor manners,
Be careful with fire,
Be considerate in the outdoors,
and be conservation-minded.

What is the responsibility of a parent of a new Scout?2019-10-16T00:19:32+00:00

Scouts BSA patrol and troop meetings are intended to be an activity for youth. They are not a family activity, and the presence of parents can be a distraction. However, parental involvement is not forbidden. If a parent or guardian would like to be present during a troop meeting, they should consult with the Scoutmaster in advance so a way can be arranged for them to observe. There also might be provision for them to register for a position on the troop committee or as an assistant Scoutmaster. There are always ways for your parent or guardian to be involved

How do adults get involved?2019-10-16T00:18:48+00:00

All troops are chartered to a local organization. The chartered organization serves as a sponsor of Scouting and is essentially the owner/operator of the Scouting unit. In this role, the head of the organization approves all adult volunteer leaders. All leaders are required to take our child safety course called “Youth Protection,” and specific training for their role in Scouting is available either online or in a classroom setting. To help the organization maintain a quality program, there is a person assigned to be a liaison between the unit and the chartered organization. In addition, every unit has a committee (typically made up of Scouting parents) that oversees proper operation and ensures a safe and fun program.

What are the Scout Oath and Scout Law?2019-10-16T00:11:55+00:00

Scout Oath
On my honor I will do my best to do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law; to help other people at all times; to keep myself physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight.

Scout Law

The Scout Law has 12 points. Each is a goal for every Scout. A Scout tries to live up to the Law every day. It is not always easy to do, but a Scout always tries.

A Scout is:

TRUSTWORTHY. Tell the truth and keep promises. People can depend on you.

LOYAL. Show that you care about your family, friends, Scout leaders, school, and country.

HELPFUL. Volunteer to help others without expecting a reward.

FRIENDLY. Be a friend to everyone, even people who are very different from you.

COURTEOUS. Be polite to everyone and always use good manners.

KIND. Treat others as you want to be treated . Never harm or kill any living thing without good reason.

OBEDIENT. Follow the rules of your family, school, and pack. Obey the laws of your community and country.

CHEERFUL. Look for the bright side of life. Cheerfully do tasks that come your way. Try to help others be happy.

THRIFTY. Work to pay your own way. Try not to be wasteful. Use time, food, supplies, and natural resources wisely.

BRAVE. Face difficult situations even when you feel afraid. Do what you think is right despite what others might be doing or saying.

CLEAN. Keep your body and mind fit . Help keep your home and community clean.

REVERENT. Be reverent toward God. Be faithful in your religious duties. Respect the beliefs of others.

What is a Cyber Chip?2019-10-15T23:47:50+00:00

Today’s youth are spending more time than ever using digital media for education, research, socializing, and fun. To help families and volunteers keep youth safe while online, the Boy Scouts of America introduces the Cyber Chip. In developing this exciting new tool, the BSA teamed up with content expert NetSmartz®, part of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children® and training expert for many law enforcement agencies.

To learn more and to take the training please visit https://www.scouting.org/training/youth-protection/cyber-chip/

 

Where are scout meetings held?2019-10-15T23:39:46+00:00

Saint Francis De Sales Catholic church located at 1450 Abingdon Road, Abingdon MD, 21009

What time and when is the typical scout meeting?2019-10-15T23:39:05+00:00

Meetings are on Sundays starting at 6:00 pm and end at 7:30 pm. We do occasionally cancel a meeting after a long trip or a holiday.

Is Scouting safe?2019-08-24T17:06:14+00:00

Yes. Programs are designed to follow a strict set of rules and policies that can be found in the Guide to Safe Scouting. Every registered adult in Scouting is required to complete a Youth Protection training course and a criminal background check. For more information, visit the Youth Protection page.

What supplies and equipment does a Scout need?2019-08-24T17:05:08+00:00

The single most important piece of equipment a Scout needs is the Scout Handbook. A local Scout shop is the best place to buy a handbook, and the staff there can guide you to get exactly what you need.

The uniform is also very important as it plays an essential role in creating a sense of belonging, and it’s where a Scout gets to display his awards and rank achievements. Check out the interactive uniform builder at www.bsauniforms.org . Uniforms can be ordered online or in person at the local Scout shop.

Additional supplies and equipment may be needed for certain activities such as camping trips or field days. What equipment is needed, as well as whether it will be provided by the troop, will vary. Unit leaders will provide information about any required supplies at the beginning of each program year.

How do adults get involved?2019-08-24T17:04:32+00:00

All troops are chartered to a local organization. The chartered organization serves as a sponsor of Scouting and is essentially the owner/operator of the Scouting unit. In this role, the head of the organization approves all adult volunteer leaders. All leaders are required to take our child safety course called “Youth Protection,” and specific training for their role in Scouting is available either online or in a classroom setting. To help the organization maintain a quality program, there is a person assigned to be a liaison between the unit and the chartered organization. In addition, every unit has a committee (typically made up of Scouting parents) that oversees proper operation and ensures a safe and fun program

What is the responsibility of a parent of a new Scout?2019-08-24T17:04:16+00:00

Scouts BSA patrol and troop meetings are intended to be an activity for youth. They are not a family activity, and the presence of parents can be a distraction. However, parental involvement is not forbidden. If a parent or guardian would like to be present during a troop meeting, they should consult with the Scoutmaster in advance so a way can be arranged for them to observe. There also might be provision for them to register for a position on the troop committee or as an assistant Scoutmaster. There are always ways for your parent or guardian to be involved.

What is the age range for joining Scouts BSA?2019-08-24T17:03:59+00:00

Youth can join a Scout troop who have earned the Arrow of Light rank and are at least 10 years old, or have completed the fifth grade and are at least 10, or who are 11, but not yet 18 years old.

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